Mountain View Housing Study

Project Page

We want to determine if new homes built by the Cook Inlet Housing Authority (CIHA) and a local CIHA contractor, both heated by boilers and furnaces, meet expectations for energy efficiency, homeowner comfort, indoor air quality, and humidity control. Four to six homes of each type were studied. The project is jointly funded by CIHA and CCHRC. Some equipment was provided by AHFC and CCHRC. CCHRC contracted the project to Sunrise Energy Works with collaboration from Arctic Energy Systems, Analysis North, Flattop Technical Services, and Alaska Building Science Network.

The project includes commissioning mechanical systems (ventilation and heating); determining heating system efficiency, total cost to operate, measurement of IAQ, and thermal comfort parameters; measuring humidity and temperature in the attic and crawl spaces; and calculating an energy rating for each house that includes pressure testing and duct leakage measurements. The final report will summarize monitoring results and building performance, identify systems that are performing well, and provide recommendations on systems or strategies that could be improved.  

Projects

DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Projects These projects seek to reduce and stabilize energy costs of tribal buildings in four different communities in Southwest Alaska.
BrHEAThe Evaluation In an effort to address these issues CCHRC developed the BrHEAThe system in 2011. BrHEAThe is a combined heating and ventilation system which uses one distribution system to provide fresh air and space heating to high-performance homes in cold climates.
Energy Recovery Ventilators (ERVs) in Cold Climates Energy Recovery Ventilators (ERVs) are whole house ventilation systems that exchange stale indoor air with fresh outside air, recovering both heat and moisture from the indoor air to save energy. They have the potential to improve indoor air quality in a cold dry climate like Interior Alaska.
Kenai Indoor Air Quality Study This project examined the most common causes of indoor air quality problems in Southcentral Alaska by monitoring 100 homes for carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, temperature, relative humidity, and radon.
Southcentral Ventilation Study This study monitored nine houses in Anchorage to assess the effectiveness of their ventilation system and compliance with the Alaska Building Energy Efficiency Standard ventilation requirements.